Wednesday, 30 July 2008

Dutch meet the Dutch

These clogs are standing at the backdoor. The people who step into them are Erwin and Emma. I found their blog on the internet while looking for blogs about Wijchen. The place were I grew up. Emma has lived for two years in Wijchen. To my surprise I saw that they lived in Christchurch as well. They are newly settled immigrants and just started a family. They have a wonderful addition to their family; a beautiful baby boy named Tobin. Of course I left a comment which resulted in a visit last Sunday. As a good Dutch tradition when a child is born, people who visit receive a beschuit met muisjes (biscuits with little mice) to celebrate it. When the baby is a boy the mice are blue and they are pink when it is a girl. Quickly we got in touch with our Dutch site and exchanged stories of how it is to live in a different country. Different stories but the same kind of experiences. Thanks guys for the wonderful time we had. This makes me look forward to returning to Holland next year with Mayke to visit family and friends. The tickets are already booked. We just have to count down. Mayke is now even more motivated to learn Dutch at Unlimited and I already planned to stay a night at my friends place and at my cousin's place. The latter is a good friend as well. I stayed at their house plenty of holidays when I was young. I remember sleeping on the Attic. Scaring away the birds from their Cherri trees early in the morning by banging on a tub. Playing in the corn behind their house till the farmer came after us. Building huts underground and having my first kiss, behind a carpet hanging on a wall, from a neighbour kid, while playing hide and seek. When I come to Holland I will certainly go to the market on a Thursday which was at my doorstep when I lived in Wijchen and buy a fresh hearing with unions. They are raw and you eat them as on the picture left. I remember how some salesman loudly tried to sell their products and all the bikes stalled in front of the shops of people who came to do their shopping and buy fresh veggies, flowers, cheese and fish on the market. Of course I will also buy Dutch liquorice and eat croquettes and fricandellen and all the other stuff I haven't seen for ages. Don't get me wrong I love New Zealand but I lived for 37 years in Holland and you can't change that.

Just have to add the link to my dear broo's blog Hollandcorner who posted a video with more typical Dutch stuff and underneath a beautiful poem for moi. More reason to go back!!! Groetjes Marja

19 comments:

  1. Hi Marja, Will you be going to Holland soon? It sounds a wonderful experience at the market. I don't know if I could eat herring like that , but I do eat the Danish way, on rye bread with mayonnaise.

    I enjoyed reading this post.

    Kat

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  2. Hello Marja, when I was in Kuching and on a tour to see the Orang Utans, we had another Dutch couple from New Zealand joining us. Is there many Dutch staying in NZ and why the migration to NZ.

    So nice to meet up with fellow countrymen, there's an immediate bond for sure. I have been to Amsterdam once, a long time ago for a short business trip. I remember the canals, eating seashells and clams by the road side, those AMAZING tulips (we only have plastics ones here!). I still have my mini clogs for decor in my home :) I am sure you looking forward to go back..I certainly would.

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  3. Oh great... there you've got your blogger meet :)

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  4. I wanna do window shopping in Holland down that street where there are plenty of women and .......errrrrr oh dear..I err
    never mind ........

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  5. it would be fun to read more about dutch food..what do you generally eat, and how and what food are made during special days like festivals

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  6. "Biscuits with little mice".

    Little mice?

    That one sounds interesting.

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  7. hello my dear! :) how are you?
    what I meant by child labour is work made by children and not paid or badly paid! :( there is a lot in India, China e other eastern countries.
    this shoes are lovely!!! :)
    big kiss from Portugal!

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  8. Hi kat, I am going in april next year so that still takes a while
    I love markets and the herring just melts in you rmouth It is delicious
    (for us)

    dear m.kate yes there are many dutch people here. It started after the war. There was nothing no jobs etc. The government paid the tickets of people who went for a new life to Canada America or New Zealand. Many went to New Zealand The parents of my husband were one of these so that's how we ended up here

    Yes thanks Anwin and it was very enjoyable and unfortunably I missed another one

    Steve get a life

    rambler the Dutch kitchen is not very impressive There are special things but we copied a lot from other countries. Italien French
    chinees

    Yes Baba the mice are undercover because of the many cats. No actually they are candied anise seeds and look like lttle mice

    Ok thanks Apo The clogs are nice but in Holland only worn for the tourists

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  9. Hi Majra
    I really enjoyed the post.
    I found thoses shoes really cuteeeeee.
    When you return from Holland pls post a lot of pictures of Holland.
    Tc.God bless you and family

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  10. thanks for stopping by my thyroid blog. i've been checking your blog out...very nice. is the maori people of new zealand kind of like the aborigines to australia? i love learning about new cultures, people, etc.

    i see that you have that crazy KB on your blog roll...better watch out for her LOL jk :) my main blog is http://ciarasramblingsandwhatnot.blogspot.com

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  11. Amazing, how much you remember, and so much details. You are still that young Dutch girl. I found the site of "De Ruyter" and is it true that these mice only can be found in Holland?
    Copy and paste in your browser:

    http://images.google.nl/imgres?imgurl=http://www.dutchgroceries.nl/images/De%2520Ruijter%2520Chocoladehagel%2520Melk.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.dutchgroceries.nl/index.php%3Fmanufacturers_id%3D27&h=200&w=200&sz=21&hl=nl&start=1&sig2=oPuJ_-ENouLPc5Rr9iW44A&um=1&tbnid=mKWUgMkxPZb5gM:&tbnh=104&tbnw=104&ei=oqaRSLvMCoqOwQGEr6StBw&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dchocolade%2Bhagelslag%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dnl%26rlz%3D1B3GGGL_nlNL264NL264%26sa%3DN

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  12. I know your feeling!
    Coming home, for even a short period of time, is so unique! After living halfway around the world, it is a feeling which I believe there are no words to explain!

    You must set up a countdown timer on your blog :)

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  13. One more!
    I added a pulldown link on my sidebar with "other expats" & listed you there. I hope you don't mind ;)

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  14. Hi Marja

    I enjoy reading your blog. You write in such a warm and engaging way. I used to love reading Dr. Suess poems and stories to my girls. Sorry we didn't meet.

    Warm wishes

    Bopb

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  15. hello my friend! I came to tell you that I've posted the result of my fusing work. do you wanna see it?
    big kiss! :)

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  16. I love hearing more about other countries! Thanks for sharing

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  17. Marja, what a lovely piece. As a young person I spent so many summers with my Dutch relations in Haarlem, and as soon as I saw the picture of the raw herring all those happy memories came flooding back. Flowers in Aalsmeer, cheese in Alkmaar, funny costumes in Volendaam and eating those little pancakes!

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  18. You come to my neighbor country; hopefully you will find the time to come to Belgium too.

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  19. hmmmmmm Haring and drop, beschuit met blauwe muisjes , en klompen YEH..

    Groeten JoAnn

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